CodeCompletion.io

Episode 26: Building a Cable Museum

Welcome to Code Completion, Episode 26! We are a group of iOS developers and educators hoping to share what we love most about development, Apple technology, and completing your code!

Follow us @CodeCompletion on Twitter to hear about our upcoming livestreams, videos, and other content.

Be sure to also sign up to our monthly newsletter, where we will recap the topics we discussed, reveal the answers to #CompleteTheCode, and share even more things we learned in between episodes.

You are what makes this show possible, so please be sure to share this with your friends and family who are also interested in any part of the app development process.

⭐️ This Week's Topics

  • Dimitri's trade-in experience.
  • What to do with old devices and boxes.
  • Our predictions for this week's Spring Loaded Apple Event.
  • The need for better iPad stories rather than faster iPads.

⚠️ Compiler Error

This week's theme: HDR Video!

  1. High dynamic range video expands on standard dynamic range by increasing not only the luminance, but also the bit depth and color volume.
  1. Standard dynamic range video is defined according to a maximum luminance of 100 nits, limited by the capabilities of CRT-based display technology.
  1. The Ultra HD Alliance defines a display as being HDR-capable only if it is able to reach a limited peak brightness of at least 1000 nits.
  1. An HDR display is capable of displaying content mastered for any maximum brightness thanks to a technique called tone mapping.
Compilation Results

This time, Spencer went first, followed by Ben. Let's see how they did!

1. High dynamic range video expands on standard dynamic range by increasing not only the luminance, but also the bit depth and color volume.

Ben and Spencer believed this to be a code completion, which it was!

2. Standard dynamic range video is defined according to a maximum luminance of 100 nits, limited by the capabilities of CRT-based display technology.

No one was led astray by this, which is unfortunate (for Dimitri) since it was also a code completion!

3. The Ultra HD Alliance defines a display as being HDR-capable only if it is able to reach a limited peak brightness of at least 1000 nits.

Everyone trusted this to be fact, despite it being the compiler error all along! Turns out the requirements are a lot lower than that, or else most displays would not be HDR capable at all!

Which means…

4. An HDR display is capable of displaying content mastered for any maximum brightness thanks to a technique called tone mapping.

Both Spencer and Ben were led astray by the terminology, because this one was a plain old code completion!

Learn More →

🎁 Sponsor

This week's episode of Code Completion is brought to you by Swiftly Built's Advanced Data Display course. Buy your ticket now on Eventbrite for one month of live iOS instruction starting on May 1st!

📹 Watch the Stream